FreeBSD for Thanksgiving 6 months in and still going strong

I’ve been working on FreeBSD for Intel for almost 6 months now. In the world of programmers, I am considered an old dog, and these 6 months have been all about learning new tricks. Luckily, I’ve found myself in a remarkably inclusive and receptive community whose patience seems plentiful. As I get ready to take some time off for the holidays, and move into that retrospective time of year, I thought I’d beat the rush a bit and update on the progress

Earlier this year, I decided to move from architect of the Linux graphics driver into a more nebulous role of FreeBSD enabling. I was excited, but also uncertain if I was making the right decision.

Earlier this half, I decided some general work in power management was highly important and began working there. I attended BSDCam (handsome guy on the right), and led a session on Power Management. I was honored to be able to lead this kind of effort.

Earlier this quarter, I put the first round of my patches up for review, implementing suspend-to-idle. I have some rougher patches to handle s0ix support when suspending-to-idle. I gave a talk MeetBSD about our team’s work.

Earlier this month, I noticed that FreeBSD doesn’t have an implementation for Intel Speed Shift (HWPstates), and I started working on that.

Earlier this week, I was promoted from a lowly mentee committer to a full src committer.

Earlier today, I decided to relegate my Linux laptop to the role of my backup machine, and I am writing this from my Dell XPS13 running FreeBSD

6 months later, I feel a lot less uncertain about making the right decision. In fact, I think both opportunities would be great, and I’m thankful this Thanksgiving that this is my life and career. I have more plans and things I want to get done. I’m looking forward to being thankful again next year.

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9 thoughts on “FreeBSD for Thanksgiving 6 months in and still going strong

  1. Thanks a lot for your work, Ben, keep it up!
    Will definitely retry FreeBSD 12 on my low-end baytrail notebooks once RELEASE is out. Hopefully your post motivated me enough to fix some of the remaining rough edges I’m experiencing. 😉

    1. None of what I’m working on will be in 12 – at least I have no intention currently of doing the MFC. I’m not opposed to it, I just don’t know how many folks would want it.

  2. I’ve been running FreeBSD exclusively on my workstation and servers for 15 years. I appreciate your contributions. Hopefully I’ll be able to start making contributions of my own next year.

  3. Which Dell laptop are you using? As I’m running FreeBSD 11 on a Dell XPS 13 (9343 cira 2015). The audio doesn’t get initialized properly (cold boot Linux, then cold boot FreeBSD makes it work!). Been trying to teach myself ACPI stuff, hopefully I’ll get there.

    1. It’s a 9370.

      What’s audio? Seriously though, I don’t have audio or wireless working OOTB. I haven’t really needed audio yet on this thing, but I will need to make that work at some point. I’m using a USB wireless dongle since Dell sadly decided to solder down an ath10k chip… thanks Qualcomm/Obama.

  4. hey Ben, Tim,

    I’ve a Dell XPS13 9360, sound just works (headphones & speakers), and while I swapped out the original Killer wifi for an Intel 8265, I believe Adrian committed the bits to make that work. If you want more details look either https://wiki.freebsd.org/Laptops/Dell_XPS13_9360 or bug me via email dch@FreeBSD or on IRC in the usual places. Super happy to hear Ben has similar h/w and happy to guinea-pig stuff.

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